My Photo

Welcome to Mannionville

  • Politics, art, movies, television, books, parenting, home repair, caffeine addiction---you name it, we blog it. Since 2004. Call for free estimate.

The Tip Jar


  • Please help keep this blog running strong with your donation

Help Save the Post Office: My snail mail address

  • Lance Mannion
    109 Third St.
    Wallkill, NY 12589
    USA

Save a Blogger From Begging...Buy Stuff


The one, the only

Sister Site

« The stuff that dreams are made of | Main | "It's really kind of a beautiful story..." »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Campaspe

I just loved this post. LOVED it.

After Terabithia I read Jacob Have I Loved and then I quit with the Katherine Paterson. Her books did not just depress me, they devastated me. That trailer for the movie is some kind of deceptive, according to what I have read about the actual film. It makes people who loved the book stay away, thinking they have turned it into Narnia, and people who take children who are too young or sensitive for it also get mad.

My childhood home was sold a long, long time ago, under very distressing circumstances, and so I empathize wholeheartedly with the 11-year-old. There is a part of me that will always ache a little bit for that rather ordinary suburban house, and I envy people who can return to the home where they grew up.

sfmike

I'll be curious to hear your take on "Pan's Labyrinth." Before seeing the movie last week, I read that it had some dark elements, but I still wasn't ready for a movie THAT unrelievedly dark. Be warned.

Claire

Wonderful post, Lance. Give the eleven y-o my condolences. I know I read Terabithia when I was about his age, but I remember nothing except crying at the end. I'm glad to hear that the movie version doesn't somehow sanitize it. I think I would have agreed with your son about the two movies when I was his age, too.

Sfmike, I saw Pan's Labyrinth last weekend, too. Man, was I not ready for that level of dark, either.

Redbeard

I wonder the same question sfmike does. People die in Pan's Labyrinth, and more than one person has illusions shattered.

Chuck

Terabitha was one of the most important books I read as a child (in 5th or 6th grade, maybe?). I'm glad to know that the movie sticks to the spirit of the book. And the comparison with "Narnia" is interesting.

Rana

Thanks for the Terebithia review; D has been feeling aggravated by the trailers to no end.

Re: Pan's Labyrinth - it is certainly dark, but I liked it. It's dark, but rich and complicated, like gourmet chocolate. I felt like everything mattered - which isn't the usual case for films that involve violence. I hate horror movies, and war movies usually leave me cold - but I came away from PL feeling satisfied in a way I usually don't after seeing a "mainstream" film.

Victoria

I was deeply moved by this post. It brought up two memories:

The first from yesterday: My four-year-old nephew was visiting my mother's house. A documentary DVD started to play and the opening music was over-the-top foreboding, actually a dumb creative choice. From his play place in the next room, the four year-old called out anxiously, "Is something bad going to happen? Mommy, is something bad going to happen? Grandma, is something bad going to happen?" This little boy asked it over and over until, after several comforting answers failed, Grandma put him in her lap and replayed the music, allthewhile explaining why they were using it. The four-year-old has been worried about things ever since a year ago when he got the book about King Arthur it turned out that fathers die... Was it the story alone? Or did the story trigger some deeper personal…what?

A much older one: I once met a guy in his 50's who told me about going to a shaman. He had had a terrible time settling down. Although he was a carpenter and built houses for other people, he could never seem to make anything home for himself...bounced from apartment to apartment, relationship to relationship. Finally, tired, lonely, and at a loss to explain himself, he went for counseling and - after a few weeks - the counselor recommended a shaman (Welcome to Northern California!). The shaman took a journey for him and returned with the vision of visiting a particular street with a particular house and in the back yard of that house finding a seven-year-old piece of this man, hammering away on an unfinished project he was working on the day his parents moved the family and everything they had to another town. The small town street she described, the bungalow house, the postage stamp yard, the blocks of wood, the experience (not wanting to leave)… they all matched an experience in his real life. God, how he loved that place! Had he really left some mysterious piece of himself there? Whatever the explanation, once the shaman “brought it back to him”, he found he could finally ground himself in his present.

Later, he gave permission to the shaman to write about his experience in her book, so has received dozens of letters from people with similar “recovery” stories. But he still marvels at the whole thing, wonders about its mechanics, worries about children suffering radical losses through things adults barely notice or comprehend.

yidu sun

Well I think that Kathrine Patterson wrote this book because her husband died. So this is very similar to her life and what she experienced in her life. So she just want to tell what she experienced. There's also a lesson to it. The lesson is when ever you lose a friend you still have a powerful and strong bong of friendship. Also when your fiend passed away he/she will stay in your heart forever.

yidu sun

Katherine Patterson wrote Bridge to Terabithia because when her son was young, she took him and his friend, Lisa, to the beach for the day. It was a sunny, cloudless day and Lisa was struck by lightning and killed. She wrote the book for her son.

Henry Holland

Excellent post.

I *hated* being a kid; I had a boring lower-middle class life, good parents etc. so nothing traumatic or anything, I just loathed being beholden to adults and having no autonomy. When I was 15 all I thought about was getting my drivers license in a year because that meant freedom. And it was! If were magically able to go back to being 11 again, I wouldn't do it. 18, yes, in a heartbeat.

you still have a powerful and strong bong of friendship

Nice typo there (in bold). :-)

Stephen Frug

Wonderful, wonderful post.

Still, it doesn't quite answer one question I have: will this movie disappoint an adult who remembers fervently loving the book as a child?

Theriomorph

Beautiful & true post, thank you for writing it.

A little while back I wrote a brief post about 'Pan's Labyrinth' and my delight in seeing magic realism brought to film with all its complex political awareness and darkness and magic and beauty intact. I was surprised by a very intense comment made in real loathing of the film calling it sadistic, saying it glorified the death of a child, it was cynical, exploitative, etc., which was so not my experience I wasn't sure quite what to say. But it got me thinking along the lines of the post you've just written - the fact that some of us find our comfort in truthful reflection of childhood awareness of death and horror, some of us flip out and want a less complex/more digestible 'child-like' emotional closure - but I'm with you that there is, for many of us, no such thing. We're meaning-making machines, even young, and 'child-like' understanding includes Fascism, the bridges between imagination and reality, the very real consequences of loss.

Anyway, thank you for this moving post - nice to discover your blog.

Theriomorph

Beautiful & true post, thank you for writing it.

A little while back I wrote a brief post about 'Pan's Labyrinth' and my delight in seeing magic realism brought to film with all its complex political awareness and darkness and magic and beauty intact. I was surprised by a very intense comment made in real loathing of the film calling it sadistic, saying it glorified the death of a child, it was cynical, exploitative, etc., which was so not my experience I wasn't sure quite what to say. But it got me thinking along the lines of the post you've just written - the fact that some of us find our comfort in truthful reflection of childhood awareness of death and horror, some of us flip out and want a less complex/more digestible 'child-like' emotional closure - but I'm with you that there is, for many of us, no such thing. We're meaning-making machines, even young, and 'child-like' understanding includes Fascism, the bridges between imagination and reality, the very real consequences of loss.

Anyway, thank you for this moving post - nice to discover your blog.

Levent Mollamustafaoglu

My blog post on Pan's Labyrinth is at

http://leventskaleidoscope.blogspot.com/2007/05/power-of-fantasy-two-films-on-contrast_27.html

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Data Analysis

  • Data Analysis

Categories

October 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    

Movies, Music, Books, Kindles, and more

For All Your Laundry Needs

In Case of Typepad Emergency Break Glass

Be Smart, Buy Books


Blog powered by Typepad