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Oscar

I'm not an expert by any stretch, but I always liked this one:

Until the Desert knows
That Water grows
His Sands suffice
But let him once suspect
That Caspian Fact
Sahara dies

Utmost is relative --
Have not or Have
Adjacent sums
Enough -- the first Abode
On the familiar Road
Galloped in Dreams --

Ken Houghton

Brecht over Inge is a difficult call; his, er, thefts from collaborators acknowledged and not have been common knowledge for at least 25-30 years.

To paraphrase Joseph Heller, channeling Paul Valery, "Ou sont les Peter Handkes d'anteayer?"

Ionesco was a nicer person than Miller (judging by meeting each once, very briefly in a fairly formal setting), and I'd prefer to be him, but you keep defending Miller.

Chris Quinones

Here's another good one:


Tell all the Truth but tell it slant—
Success in Circuit lies
Too bright for our infirm Delight
The Truth's superb surprise

As Lightning to the Children eased
With explanation kind
The Truth must dazzle gradually
Or every man be blind—

sfmike

The composer John Adams has just written an autobiography called "Hallelujah Junction," which might interest you. His first great musical triumph was a piece called "Harmonium," commissioned for the San Francisco Symphony when they moved into their new symphony hall in the early 1980s. The music director Edo de Waart commissioned a symphony with chorus and no other specifications. The first movement is a John Donne poem and the next two movements are Emily Dickinson, ending with "Wild Nights!" It may be some of the most outrageously sexy music imaginable. Check it out.

Juno

You know the Billy Collins poem, Taking of Emily Dickinson's Clothes? I had a great conversation with a friend of mine about that - he thought it was a peculiarly bloodless kind of seduction, all trembling promise and intellectualism, and very little sweat. I thought the depth of attention was sexy, but the idealization was....passion at a remove.

I love the things I've been reading recently that imply she might have had a non-abstract basis for her passionate prayers. Everyone should.

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