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Kevin Wolf

There may be a prescription in your future.

Claire

Hahahaha, that's hilarious. I hope you sleep soundly tonight.

bgn

Are you sure it wasn't Nicolae "Antichrist" Carpathia? He's said to look a lot like Redford...

Rana

*laughs*

Ken Muldrew

Didn't he use potato skins to get the right texture? That's what I do. Remind me to tell you about the process sometime...

Linkmeister

If he did use potato skins, he got the side benefit of getting the raw material for home fries when he was done with his art.

burritoboy


Northern Renaissance or Italian Renaissance?

Unfortunately, I could not locate a good image of Tilman Riemenschneider's Nativity (a panel in his masterwork - the High Altar of the Hergottkirche in Creglingen, Baden-Wurtemburg, c. 1505-1510).

But here is another fine piece (c. 1523) by the less well known Viet Stoss in the Bamberg Cathedral (though Stoss was quite literally a superstar artist in his time, placing works in numerous cathedrals and princely palaces throughout Germany, Poland and Sweden):

http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/s/stoss/bamberg1.jpg
http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/s/stoss/bamberg2.jpg

Uh, yeah, I'm kind of obsessed with the sculpture of 1450-1530 from Southern Germany, as I'm sure everyone can tell. Not as much a fan of the more mainstream Flemish school of the time.

Restoring a major work like the one in your dream is not something that should be untaken by an amateur. There are very, very few such works left - only a handful of large works have appeared on the art market in the past decade.

burritoboy


Northern Renaissance or Italian Renaissance?

Unfortunately, I could not locate a good image of Tilman Riemenschneider's Nativity (a panel in his masterwork - the High Altar of the Hergottkirche in Creglingen, Baden-Wurtemburg, c. 1505-1510).

But here is another fine piece (c. 1523) by the less well known Viet Stoss in the Bamberg Cathedral (though Stoss was quite literally a superstar artist in his time, placing works in numerous cathedrals and princely palaces throughout Germany, Poland and Sweden):

http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/s/stoss/bamberg1.jpg
http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/s/stoss/bamberg2.jpg

Uh, yeah, I'm kind of obsessed with the sculpture of 1450-1530 from Southern Germany, as I'm sure everyone can tell. Not as much a fan of the more mainstream Flemish school of the time.

Restoring a major work like the one in your dream is not something that should be untaken by an amateur. There are very, very few such works left - only a handful of large works have appeared on the art market in the past decade.

burritoboy


sorry for the double posting! - late Gothic / early Renaissaince sculpture is indeed one of my primary hobbies!

untaken = undertaken

also, I don't believe I'm familiar with any large multi-figural work of the time that used plaster. This type of thing would be either in limewood (in Southern Germany), rosewood/oak in Flanders, possibly stone or in Italy, could be a terracotta relief.

Lance

bb: also, I don't believe I'm familiar with any large multi-figural work of the time that used plaster. This type of thing would be either in limewood (in Southern Germany), rosewood/oak in Flanders, possibly stone or in Italy, could be a terracotta relief.

Holy Christ, I thought I was awake. Apparently not. I'm still dreaming.

Jennifer

You are asleep, Lance, and you're carving the Magi out of potatoes... potatoes you just peeled.

Sigmoid Froyd

Translated: "If you don't pluck out the eyes, you could be poisoned, Bud. Get well-plastered, go barefoot in the park instead, Spud."

Idyllopus

I would have commented on this yesterday, and almost did (I started to) but I was so profoundly impressed that I couldn't think of anything to say. And I still can't.

Last week I fell asleep during my second viewing Altman's commentary on the making of "Three Women" and dreamt I was walking around the set of the film while it was being made. When I woke up it took several hours for the atmosphere to fully depart.

Theriomorph

That's damn funny.

Here's a present for you - a very funny site your post brought to mind.

The Dull Men's Club, A place -- in cyberspace -- where Dull Men can share thoughts and experiences, free from pressures to be in and trendy, free instead to enjoy the simple, ordinary things of everyday life


http://www.dullmen.com/home.html

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